Spontaneous Intercession

| 08 September 2020

I was diagnosed with cancer nine years ago and as a result had to have a rather large surgery. My grandson was about seven at the time and heard our son and his wife talking about it. My daughter-in-law later told me that when they prayed together that night before bed, his prayer was, “God please let grandma have fun in her surgery!” When she told me that, I had to laugh, was so touched that he prayed, and then was grateful that in his innocence he prayed that no matter what “surgery” was, he sure wanted me to have a good time. I was blessed by my grandson interceding on my behalf and by Melanie sharing it with me.

Intercessions are prayers for others or on behalf of others. We join Jesus and the Holy Spirit in prayer for our family, friends, pastors, leaders and those we don’t know. We might think that we initiate prayers but really it’s the work of the Holy Spirit in and through us. The Spirit has prompted us to pray, preceded us in prayer and then prays with and for us.The desire to intercede in prayer comes from a close personal relationship with our heavenly Father, his son Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit’s nudging. The bible promises that if we draw close to God, He will draw close to us. (James 4:8) It also comes from an understanding of our responsibility to stand in the gap for other people.

“Intercession requires my center of gravity to shift away from my own personal needs toward those of others.” – Pete Greig

Intercession is a way of loving others. Paul says in 1st Timothy, “First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people…

I’ve learned the greatest blessing we can give someone is offering to pray with them spontaneously. When someone shares a burden, concern or even traumatic event in their life, besides listening patiently we can bless them by praying. Right there in that moment, ask if you can pray for them. Not a complicated prayer; just simply asking for the Lord’s direction and help with and for them. No one has ever refused my offer to pray with them, but some (especially people I don’t know) have been surprised I asked. You don’t have to be a pastor, counselor, church staff member etc. to be qualified to pray with someone. You are already qualified, but it requires a certain amount of boldness or courage in the beginning.

Ask the Lord for opportunities to pray with people and for his help. He wants to welcome you to his “intercession team.” You will be blessed.

Deb Hill
Executive Administrative Assistant